Popular cosplayer speaks out about being groped outside of NYCC

Respect for your fellow human being. It doesn’t matter if you *think* she or he wants your attention, unless that person consents, keep your paws off!

Popular cosplayer speaks out about being groped outside of NYCC

Popular cosplayer speaks out about being groped outside of NYCC

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SAP ASE: Using unix domain sockets for turbo bulk copying (BCP)

Cory Sane back in March SAP Sybase2013 on SCN wrote about using unix domain sockets for bulk copying of data in/out of SAP Sybase ASE 15.7.

If you don’t know what unix domain sockets are, Thomas Stover over at Tech Deviancy wrote up an excellent Demystifying Unix Domain Sockets post. Highly recommended!
As usual, Wikipedia also has an article.

What is so great about unix domain sockets? You bypass the networking layer completely. This translates into faster communication between bcp (or similar) and ASE. The downside? The bcp file(s) must be on the same host as the ASE instance and your user must have read/write access to the ‘file’.

Using unix domain sockets with a 16k packet size appears to be ideal for the bcp out (1 million rows in the test). Notice the difference of time between using normal (tcp) connection of 5K rows / second compared to 104k rows / second connecting with unix domain socket.

Unix Domain Sockets

tcp - packet size 65024
test #1  : Clock Time (ms.): total = 184821  Avg = 0 (5410.64 rows per sec.)
test #2  : Clock Time (ms.): total = 178612  Avg = 0 (5598.73 rows per sec.)

uds - packet size 2048
test #3  : Clock Time (ms.): total = 10843  Avg = 0 (92225.40 rows per sec.)
test #4  : Clock Time (ms.): total = 11012  Avg = 0 (90810.03 rows per sec.)

uds - packet size 8192
test #5  : Clock Time (ms.): total = 9823  Avg = 0 (101801.89 rows per sec.)
test #6  : Clock Time (ms.): total = 9965  Avg = 0 (100351.23 rows per sec.)

uds - packet size 12288
test #7  : Clock Time (ms.): total = 9735  Avg = 0 (102722.14 rows per sec.)
test #8  : Clock Time (ms.): total = 9745  Avg = 0 (102616.73 rows per sec.)

uds - packet size 16384
test #9  : Clock Time (ms.): total = 9587  Avg = 0 (104307.92 rows per sec.)
test #10 : Clock Time (ms.): total = 9558  Avg = 0 (104624.40 rows per sec.)

uds - packet size 32768
test #11 : Clock Time (ms.): total = 13205  Avg = 0 (75728.89 rows per sec.)
test #12 : Clock Time (ms.): total = 12961  Avg = 0 (77154.54 rows per sec.)

uds - packet size 65024
test #13 : Clock Time (ms.): total = 13254  Avg = 0 (75448.92 rows per sec.)
test #14 : Clock Time (ms.): total = 13179  Avg = 0 (75878.29 rows per sec.)

With unix domain sockets, we come close to DTU speeds without the penalty of exclusive table locks and a DTU process you can’t kill. It really is like pushing the turbo button!

Obviously, if you are bulk copying out of a view that uses a monster index you you may not see a huge difference, if any, because the majority of the time will transverse that index.

You will see a larger boost with bulk copying out of data than in of data. Why? The network layer is usually not the bottleneck when inserting of data. The bottleneck tends to be more allocating/populating pages in the database or index population if you haven’t dropped the indexes. YMMV

Setting up unix domain sockets is very simple and does NOT require a reboot. Let’s me show you how:

The format of the query master lines you would add to the interfaces file is simple:

query afunix unused //hostname/directory_you_can_write_to/file_name
master afunix unused //hostname/directory_you_can_write_to/file_name

for example:

query afunix unused //myase/dbms/sybase/ASE.socket
master afunix unused //myase/dbms/sybase/ASE.socket

If you want to start the listener without restarting, use sp_listener:

sp_listener 'start', 'afunix://hostname:/directory_you_can_write_to/file_name'

for example:

sp_listener 'start', 'afunix://myase:/dbms/sybase/ASE.socket'
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SAP Sybase IQ: Index Advisor for a user

There are times when you need individual users the ability to determine what indexes are suggested by the index advisor but you don’t want or are unable to give them full dba access. All you need to do is grant the execute permission on the sp_iqindexadvice stored procedure.

Grant execute on sp_iqindexadvice to user;

create table test (col1 int, col2 varchar(10));
insert into test values (1, 'test1');
insert into test values (2, 'test2');
insert into test values (3, 'test3');
insert into test values (4, 'test4');
commit;

SET OPTION index_advisor = 'ON';
SET OPTION index_advisor_max_rows = 100;
commit;

select * from test where col1 =1 ;
commit;

call sp_iqindexadvice ();
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