HowTo: Set up iSCSI with Multipath (MPIO) in Windows 10 SOLVED

I searched high and low and wasn’t able to find a definitive answer on whether Microsoft Windows 10 supports multipath (MPIO) over iSCSI. I found many many blog posts, articles, and press releases for Windows servers but nothing for Windows 10.

The good news is that Windows 10 supports it out of the box. You don’t have to install anything extra. Of course, the see the benefits of multipath, you will need two or more network cards. You can either bond the network cards together or set up individual routes to the iSCSI network addresses. I’ll assume that you did that already. 🙂

This is only for new connections to your iSCSI targets.  You can not retrofit multipath on to existing connections.  You will need to offline the volumes, remove the targets from the favorites and then reboot.

As an administrator on your Windows 10 box:

  • Launch the iSCSI initiator (Windows key and type iscsi initiator)

  • Add both ip/ports to the iSCSI host in the Discovery -> Portal Groups tab

  • Refresh the iSCSI targets in the Targets tab.  If they aren’t shown, add them manually
  • Select the iSCSI target, click connect, and select “Add this connection to the list of favorites…” (so it will automatically connect the next time you start windows)  and “Enable MPIO”.  Click Okay

  • Select the iSCSI target, click properties.  In the Portal Groups tab you should see both ip/port paths

  • If you needed to offline the volumes, you will need to now online them.  They should retain any drive letter assignments
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Microsoft Office 365 and Windows 10: Error Code 0xC004c780 activate issue

If you receive the error message 0xC004c780 when activating a Microsoft product, just wait a few hours. The error message typically means the activation servers at Microsoft are temporarily overloaded. This occurred most recently during the Windows 10 Anniversary Update weekend (8/14/2016)

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Windows 10: Touch Screen not working? Solved!

I have a Toshiba laptop running Microsoft Windows 10. I’ve recently reinstalled the operating system and noticed that the touch screen stopped working. I searched high and low looking for an answer but didn’t find one that would work.

Microsoft recommends the following but it didn’t help me:

  1. Re-start your PC.
  2. Wipe it off. Use a microfiber cloth if possible.
  3. Search Calibrate the screen for pen or touch input from the task bar and select the top result. Hit the Setup button and follow the prompts.
  4. Search Device manager from the task bar and select the top result. Select Monitors and right click on the name of your monitor. If one of the menu items is enable, choose that.
  5. Repeat process number four above, but this time choose Update driver software from the right-click menu.

It was, however, quite close to what I discovered was thedevicemanager problem.   If I went into Device Manager (Windows Key + X and choose Device Manager) and Disabled/Enabled the HID-compliant touch screen device the touch screen would work for a few minutes and then suddenly stop working again.

After scratching my thinning hair on top of my head, it dawned on me that it was probably power management related.  I looked in the Power Management tab for the device but the option was disabled.

Sodevicemanager2 what to look at next?  All of the Human Interface Devices run as USB devices.

Looking at the Universal Serial Bus Controllers I saw that several of the devicemanager3USB Hubs and such did have the Allow the computer to turn off this device to save power option set.
I unchecked the option and disabled/enabled the HID-compliant touch screen device and Voila! the touch screen worked!  It’s been several hours now and the touch screen is still working fine.

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TeachUComp: OneNote 2013 Tutorial Linked Notes Microsoft Training Lesson 13.1 (YouTube)


Video by TeachUComp 🙂

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Loel Phelps: How To Create Sticky (Post-it) Notes With OneNote 2013 (YouTube)

Video by Loel Phelps 🙂

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Tweaking Microsoft Surface 3

I use a Microsoft Surface 3 Pro among other things at work. It’s growing on me. Here is a short video on how to tweak it

Video by Seon Ong

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Take effective meeting minutes using OneNote 2013

I’ve been getting into Microsoft OneNote for taking notes, getting organized and so on. Little things like taking notes in a meeting can save your backside (CYA). If there is a white board involved, make sure you use Microsoft’s Office Lens or similar to take a picture of the white board and embed it in your notes

Video by Business Productivity

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Test post using Microsoft OneNote

This is a test.

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Microsoft OneNote for Pros – Smart Note-Taking Tips

Learn how you can use hot keys, insert and use Audio/Video, integrate Excel, and check changes/versions to a doc through the history tab to be more productive in OneNote. Work Smart brings tips/tricks from Microsoft IT that improve digital productivity and help create an all-digital culture within Microsoft.

Getting into OneNote now…..

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I was using OneNote like a neanderthal. Now I know better :)

David Smith shows how to use Microsoft’s OneNote so that it is actually useful

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